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Intel Compute Stick now comes with Ubuntu

Intel Compute Stick Front Tipped

The Intel® Compute Stick now comes in more flavours, with the announcement that an Ubuntu version (Intel product number STCK1A8LFC) will be available globally via major online and retail stockists. This new Ubuntu-based version of the Intel Compute Stick is expected to be priced at around $110 USD and will go on sale next week.

The Intel Compute Stick sets a new standard for stick computing devices. It enables the transformation of a display into a fully functioning computer. By plugging the Intel Compute Stick into any HDMI TV or monitor, and connecting it to a wireless router, keyboard and mouse, users can work, stream media and play games.

Intel Compute Stick Straight Horizontal

The Intel Compute Stick with Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand and yet is powerful enough to house an Intel Atom quad-core processor. With 64-bit Ubuntu OS embedded, the Intel Compute Stick has all the performance needed for running thin client, embedded, collaboration or cloud applications. The Intel Compute Sticks makes it easy to stay productive whether in the office, a conference room, moving from desk to desk in the workplace or even in travel. Ample onboard storage means that regardless of location, your system and files are always with you.

The on-board microSD card slot provides the option of additional storage enabling you to store even more music, movie and files more quickly and easily. And you don’t need to worry about theft, either. The Intel Compute Stick has a security notch for securing to objects with a cable, ensuring that your device moves only when you want it to.

Intel Compute Stick Side Right Angle

Jane Silber, CEO of Canonical said: “Consumers are looking for a more personal, flexible and cost-effective computing experience, and also looking for a choice of OS. It’s great to see Ubuntu becomes part of the Compute Stick family. This is another example of how we’re working with Intel to bring a wide range of devices to market to give as many people as possible the chance to discover Ubuntu.”

“This is another milestone in our productive partnership with Canonical,” said Joel Christensen, General Manager of Intel NUC and Intel Compute Stick Products. “We are pleased to be able to offer our latest product, the Intel Compute Stick with Ubuntu, to our customers. I’m excited for the possibilities this combination will create in the marketplace.”

For more information, visit www.intel.com/ComputeStick

Linux Mint 17.2 “Rafaela” MATE released!

The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 17.2 “Rafaela” MATE.

Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela MATE Edition

Linux Mint 17.2 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2019. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

New features at a glance:

For a complete overview and to see screenshots of the new features, visit: “What’s new in Linux Mint 17.2 MATE“.

Important info:

To be aware of issues and read about explanations and possible solutions related to this release, visit: “Release Notes for Linux Mint 17.2 MATE

System requirements:

  • 512MB RAM (1GB recommended for a comfortable usage).
  • 9GB of disk space (20GB recommended).
  • Graphics card capable of 800×600 resolution (1024×768 recommended).
  • DVD drive or USB port.

Notes:

  • The 64-bit ISO can boot with BIOS or UEFI.
  • The 32-bit ISO can only boot with BIOS.
  • The 64-bit ISO is recommend for all modern computers (Almost all computers sold in the last 10 years are equipped with 64-bit processors).

Upgrade instructions:

  • If you want to upgrade from Linux Mint 17.2 RC, simply launch the Update Manager and install any Level 1 update available.
  • If you want to upgrade from Linux Mint 17 or Linux Mint 17.1, please wait for a few days while we release a new version of the Update Manager to you. In the meantime, you do not need to download or to reinstall anything. We’ll make announcements next week when this is ready.

Download:Md5 sum:

Torrents:

HTTP Mirrors for the 32-bit DVD ISO:

HTTP Mirrors for the 64-bit DVD ISO:

Alternative downloads:

No-codecs images:

Distributors and magazines in Japan, USA and countries where distributing media codecs is problematic can use the “No Codecs” ISO images.  These images will be made available next week, for both the MATE and Cinnamon edition in 32-bit and 64-bit at the following address:

http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=25

OEM images:

Manufacturers can pre-install Linux Mint on their computers using the OEM installation images. These images will be made available next week, for both the MATE and Cinnamon edition in 64-bit at the following address:

http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=25

Enjoy!

We look forward to receiving your feedback. Thank you for using Linux Mint and have a lot of fun with this new release!

Linux Mint 17.2 “Rafaela” Cinnamon released!

The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 17.2 “Rafaela” Cinnamon.

Linux Mint 17.2 Rafaela Cinnamon Edition

Linux Mint 17.2 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2019. It comes with updated software and brings refinements and many new features to make your desktop even more comfortable to use.

New features at a glance:

To be aware of issues and read about explanations and possible solutions related to this release, visit: “Release Notes for Linux Mint 17.2 Cinnamon

System requirements:

  • 512MB RAM (1GB recommended for a comfortable usage).
  • 9GB of disk space (20GB recommended).
  • Graphics card capable of 800×600 resolution (1024×768 recommended).
  • DVD drive or USB port.

Notes:

  • The 64-bit ISO can boot with BIOS or UEFI.
  • The 32-bit ISO can only boot with BIOS.
  • The 64-bit ISO is recommend for all modern computers (Almost all computers sold in the last 10 years are equipped with 64-bit processors).

Upgrade instructions:

  • If you want to upgrade from Linux Mint 17.2 RC, simply launch the Update Manager and install any Level 1 update available.
  • If you want to upgrade from Linux Mint 17 or Linux Mint 17.1, please wait for a few days while we release a new version of the Update Manager to you. In the meantime, you do not need to download or to reinstall anything. We’ll make announcements next week when this is ready.

Download:

Md5 sum:

Torrents:

HTTP Mirrors for the 32-bit DVD ISO:

HTTP Mirrors for the 64-bit DVD ISO:

Alternative downloads:

No-codecs images:

Distributors and magazines in Japan, USA and countries where distributing media codecs is problematic can use the “No Codecs” ISO images.  These images will be made available next week, for both the MATE and Cinnamon edition in 32-bit and 64-bit at the following address:

http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=25

OEM images:

Manufacturers can pre-install Linux Mint on their computers using the OEM installation images. These images will be made available next week, for both the MATE and Cinnamon edition in 64-bit at the following address:

http://www.linuxmint.com/release.php?id=25

Enjoy!

We look forward to receiving your feedback. Thank you for using Linux Mint and have a lot of fun with this new release!

Publishing LXD images

While some work remains to be done for ‘lxc publish’, the current support is sufficient to show a full cycle of image workload with lxd.

Ubuntu Wily comes with systemd by default. Sometimes you might need a Wily container with upstart. And to repeatedly reproduce some tests on Wily with upstart, you might want to create a container image.

# lxc remote add lxc images.linuxcontainers.org # lxc launch lxc:ubuntu/wily/amd64 w1 # lxc exec w1 -- apt-get -y install upstart-bin upstart-sysv # lxc stop w1 # lxc publish --public w1 --alias=wily-with-upstart # lxc image copy wily-with-upstart remote: # optional 

Now you can start a new container using

# lxc launch wily-with-upstart w-test-1 # lxc exec w-test-1 -- ls -alh /sbin/init lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 7 May 18 10:20 /sbin/init -> upstart # lxc exec w-test-1 run-my-tests 

Importantly, because “–public” was passed to the lxc publish command, anyone who can reach your lxd server or the image server at “remote:” will also be able to use the image. Of course, for private images, don’t use “–public”.

About the author

Serge Hallyn works for Canonical as a member of the Ubuntu Server team, with a particular focus on the virtualization stack. He has been involved with containers since the first upstream kernel patches for uts and pid namespaces. He was involved with LSM from the start, is listed as co-maintainer of the security subsystem and capabilities, and is a core maintainer of the LXC project.

Android equivalents on the Ubuntu phone

The idea behind this video is to show Ubuntu equivalents for my most used Android apps.

Ubuntu apps shown:
Google+
YouTube
Gmail/Photos/Calendar/Drive
HERE / OSMtouch
Camera
Udropcabin
File Manager
CuteSpotify

Honourable Mentions:
OSMtouch
Telegram

EDIT: The small font bug in OSMscout (on the MX4) is now fixed. Yay!

Full Circle #98 has arrived!

 

FCM98-cover

Full Circle – the independent magazine for the Ubuntu Linux community are proud to announce the release of our ninety-eighth issue.

This month:
* Command & Conquer
* How-To : Conky Reminder, LibreOffice, and Programming JavaScript
* Graphics : Inkscape.
* Chrome Cult
* Linux Labs: Midnight Commander
* Ubuntu Phones
* Review: Saitek Pro Flight System
* Book Reviews: Automate Boring Stuff With Python, and Teach Your Kids To Code
* Ubuntu Games: Minetest, and Free to Play Games
plus: News, Arduino, Q&A, and soooo much more.

Get it while it’s hot!
http://fullcirclemagazine.org/issue-98

It’s all about containers! ODS keynote

It’s all about containers. All attention is turning to new and innovative variants of this cloud development technology. From LXC and Docker to our recent introduction, LXD – all signs point to an explosion in appetite for for containers, and the many benefits they bring to developers.

Containers are revolutionizing the way the enterprise manages cloud infrastructure. They provide flexible safe-havens to allow innovation to flourish, and, in the case of LXD, the speed and density it takes to launch hundreds of machines on a single server.

In Vancouver at ODS, the focus for the Canonical team was to bring to life the power and flexibility of LXD. Is it a hypervisor? What about Docker? How does LXC fit in and does it really crush KVM on density and speed? We’ve captured James Page and Ryan Harper’s OpenStack Summit keynote above which sought to answer all these questions and more.

Announcing Benchmarking with Juju

juju_machine_view

Benchmarking and performance are interesting problems, especially in today’s growing cloud-based microservice scene. It used to be a question of “how does this hardware compare to that hardware,” but as computing and service-oriented architectures grow the question has evolved. How does my cloud and application stack handle this? It’s no longer enough to run PTS on your web server and call it a day.

Measuring every microservice in your stack, from backend to frontend, is a complex task. We started thinking about how you would model a system to benchmark all of these services. It’s not just a matter of measuring the performance of one service, but also its interactions with other services. Now multiply that by every config option for every service, like PostgreSQL, which has hundreds of options that can affect performance.

Juju has been modeling service orchestration since 2010. It’s done a great job of taking complex scenarios that are now booming, such as containerization, service oriented architectures and hyperscale, and condensing those ideas down into composable, reusable, pieces. Today we’re adding benchmarking. The ability not just to define the relationships between these services, but how they should be measured in relation to each other.

As an example, monitoring the effect of adjusting the cache in nginx is a solved problem. What we’re going after is what happens when you adjust any service in your stack in relation to every other service. Turn every knob programmatically and measure it at any scale, on any cloud. Where exactly will you get the best performance: your application, the cache layer, or the backend database? Which configuration of that database stack is most performant? Which microservice benefits from faster disk I/O? These are the kinds of questions we want answered.

With Juju Actions, we can now encapsulate tasks to run against a single unit or service in a repeatable, reliable, and composable way. Benchmarking is a natural extension of Actions, allowing authors to encapsulate the best practices for measuring the performance of a service and serve those results — in a standard way — that any user or tool can digest.

We’re announcing charm-benchmark, a library written in Python that includes bash scripts so you can write benchmarks in any language. It uses action-set under the covers to create a simple schema that anyone can use and parse.

While we may intimately know a few services, we’re by no means the experts. We’ve created benchmarks for some of popular services in the charm store, such as mongodb, cassandra, mysql and siege, in order to provide a basic set of examples. Now we’re looking for community experts who are interested in benchmarking in order to fill the gap of knowledge. We’re excited about performance and how Juju can be used to model performance validation. We need more expertise on how to stress a service or workload to measure that performance.

For example, here’s what a benchmark for siege would look like:

actions.yaml:

siege: description: Standard siege benchmark. params: concurrent: description: The number of simultaneous users to stress the web server with. type: integer default: 25 time: description: The time to run the siege test for. type: string default: "1M" delay: description: | Delay each simulated user for a random number of seconds between one and DELAY seconds. type: integer default: 3

actions/siege:

#!/bin/bash set -eux # Make sure charm-benchmark is installed if ! hash benchmark-start 2&>/dev/null; then apt-get install -y python-pip pip install -U charm-benchmark fi runtime=`action-get time` concurrency=`action-get concurrency` delay=`action-get delay` run=`date +%s` mkdir -p /opt/siege/results/$run benchmark-start # Run your benchmark siege -R $CHARM_DIR/.siegerc -t ${runtime:-1M} -c ${concurrency:-25} -d ${delay:-3} -q --log=/opt/siege/results/$run/siege.log # Grep/awk/parse the results benchmark-data transactions $transactions hits desc benchmark-data transaction_rate $hits “hits/sec” desc benchmark-data transferred $transferred MB desc benchmark-data response_time $response ms asc # Set the composite, which is the single most important score benchmark-composite transaction_rate $hits hits/sec desc benchmark-finish || true

We’ll be covering benchmarking in the next Juju Office Hours on July 9th at 1600 EDT/20:00 UTC and we’d love to help anyone who wants to get started, you can find me, Adam Israel (aisrael), Marco Ceppi (marcoceppi), and Tim Van Steenburgh (tvansteenburgh) on #juju on Freenode and on the Juju mailing list.

quasardb joins the Charm Partner Programme

Canonical is excited to announce that quasardb has joined the Charm Partner Programme. Canonical’s Charm Partner Programme helps solution providers make best use of Canonical’s universal service modeling tool, Juju; enabling instant workload deployment, integration, and scaling on virtually any public or private cloud, as well as bare metal, at the click of a button. The Juju Charm Store has over 300 cloud based applications ready for use.

quasardb is a a very fast and scalable distributed key-value store used in production in several banks, including Exane Derivatives, an affiliate of BNP Paribas. It scales horizontally and vertically for virtually unlimited capabilities, without any compromise regarding reliability and consistency.

Edouard Alligand, CTO of quasardb, said, “We are very happy to join the Juju ecosystem and are excited to work with Canonical to provide users with the best integration possible. There is a lot of value in deploying instantly a lot of nodes and it fits perfectly with quasardb hot plug’n’play model.”

“We are thrilled to welcome quasardb to our growing Juju ecosystem, and to offer our users a highly scalable key-value database to integrate into their deployments,” said Stefan Johansson, Global Software Alliances Director.

To learn more about Canonical’s partner programmes, including the Charm Partner Programme, please visit http://partners.ubuntu.com/.

So you want to buy a Meizu MX4 huh?

Well, you need to show you’re up for the challenge of owning an Ubuntu phone.

From tomorrow you’ll be able to buy the Meizu MX4, but only if you earn an invite. When you first visit the site you’ll see some hotspots on the origami themed wall.

meizu-01

If you’re lucky enough to find a hotspot with an invite then you’ll be able to cash in that invite and buy a brand spanking new MX4.

meizu-02

The invites are randomly generated, and if you’re not lucky enough to find one then you can try again over several days.

The idea behind it is to limit the amount of buyers, but without doing flash sales (thank God!) and making sure that people realise that it’s an Ubuntu phone they’re buying, and not an Android device.

It’s a novel idea, but I just hope there’s enough invites and units to supply the demand.

http://www.meizu.com/en/