First Look at Jeoss, a Lean and Mean Ubuntu-Based Server Distribution

There is a new Linux on the block and its name is Jeoss. What’s Jeoss? It’s a compact, install-everywhere Ubuntu-based server distribution. Does the world need yet another Ubuntu derivative? Sure, why not? Let’s install Jeoss and kick its tires.

What It Is

Jeoss is a descendant of JeOS (just enough operating system), which was based on Ubuntu 7.10, Gutsy Gibbon. JeOS was intended to be a VMWare virtual appliance. JeOS is no longer a separate project, but has been absorbed into Ubuntu Server.

Jeoss is maintained by Patrick Massotta, and is based on Ubuntu 8.04 LTS, the Hardy Heron. It is not virtualized, but rather trimmed down to the naked essentials for a lean, mean efficient server. It uses a modified Ubuntu linux-image-2.6.24-27-server kernel. It differs from the Ubuntu server kernel in three significant ways: it is low-latency, it includes i586 instructions, and it does not require a PAE-enabled CPU. (PAE, Physical Address Extension, is a slick hack for 32-bit CPUs to access more than 4 GB RAM.) So Jeoss can be used with lower-power and non-PAE CPUs like Pentiums and AMD Geode processors, which are popular on single-board computers.

Read more at Linux.com

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